3D Systems Cube 3D Printer

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  • An all new desktop 3D printer capable of two-color printing in both ABS and PLA plastics, at resolutions as fine as 70 microns. Design models up to 6 x 6 x 6″ in volume, and the Cube 3 will build them by melting plastic in thin sheets, depositing layer upon layer until they form a three-dimensional object.
  •   Filament for the Cube 3 comes in redesigned smart cartridges that detect the type and quantity of material in the cartridge, which prompts the Cube to adjust printing settings accordingly. Cube 3 cartridges come in over 20 colors, which can be blended in several hundred combinations when using the dual-jet capability.
  • Design your model in virtually any CAD software, and convert it to an .stl file for compatibility with the Cubify software. After the Cubify software converts your design to .cube3 format, transfer it onto the included USB stick and insert directly into your Cube, or send it wirelessly via Wi-Fi from your desktop or smartphone.
  • The Cube 3 Printer is recommended for children 8+ and meets IEC Home Printer Certification 60953 (TUV). When printing with ABS, ensure adequate ventilation, as the oil-based plastic gives off fumes when melted.
  • The fully-assembled Cube 3 comes with two PLA cartridges, typically neon green and white, but colors may vary. Also included are 25 free designs and a USB stick to help you start printing right out of the box.
  • Smart, Moisture-Lock Cartridges 3D Systems redesigned their filament cartridges expressly for the Cube 3. Instant-load cartridges with non-clog technology and moisture-lock construction preserve the life and quality of the materials. The printer detects material type automatically based on the cartridge, eliminating the need to change print settings. Cubify Software The Cubify software is a free download that converts .stl and .creation files into .cube3 format, which is the only format your Cube will print. Most CAD software can create .stl files, but if you have .obj or other file formats, you’ll need to convert them to .stl before using Cubify to convert them further into .cube3 format. The Cube software works on both Windows and Mac OS X.
  • Although the Cubify software lets you orient, scale, and add supports to your 3D model, it is not a design tool. Wired & Wireless Printing Transfer your completed designs to your 3D printer with the provided USB stick or via Wi-Fi from your desktop software. Precision & Print Mode The Cube 3 features an auto-leveling print pad that eliminates the human error possible with manual calibration. Your printer is also capable of very fine, precise printing at a 70-micron resolution – thinner than a piece of paper. Of course you can always choose faster printing, at 200 microns, when such detail isn’t necessary.

 

RE-Blog: A case study on Virtual Desktops and BYOD at Lone Star College

Source: http://edcetera.rafter.com/virtual-desktops-and-byod-at-lone-star-college/

As the higher education environment becomes more digital – and more global – it’s growing increasingly difficult for schools to provide access to software and data. Most departments and programs require unique solutions, and contracting for individual licenses can become a mess. Quite a few schools have also merged into city- and state-wide consortia, and many students need to access programs on multiple campuses. Overall, the device-centric model of computing (and contracting) just doesn’t work anymore.

Fortunately, plenty of companies are now offering virtualization services that make the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) model feasible and affordable. Take the Lone Star College System, where Vice Chancellor Link Alander is implementing VMWare’s virtual desktop. Within the next year, Lone Star’s 90,000+ students and faculty will be able to use their own devices to access software and data from each of the system’s six campuses.

Focusing Wireless Density and Centralization
Lone Star began redesigning its IT infrastructure three years ago with a focus on wireless density and centralization. “Networking isn’t just about wireless anymore – it’s about wireless density,” says Alander. Because of its growing student body and the increasing tech demands of its academic programs, the system needed a way to centralize email, productivity apps, and critical data. “The virtual desktop was the only way to provide a rich, quality experience and still meet legal requirements around licensing,” Alander says.

For now, one Lone Star campus with roughly 7,000 students is taking advantage of the program. Students and teachers log in to a central hub for email and Office 365, as well as advanced editing tools like AutoCAD and Premier. Saving to the virtual desktop’s “My Documents” folder also routes their data to a private cloud.

The virtual environment works on a variety of devices and operating systems, as well. A Lone Star poll revealed a 2.6 to 1 IP address-to-student ratio, so the desktop’s interoperability is clearly needed. Some classes even feature device-centric content – especially for iPads – but the virtual environment allows Windows and Mac users to stay on the same page.

Finally, Lone Star’s new infrastructure has drastically streamlined workflows for students attending multiple campuses. Most LC students visit at least two campuses per week, and a few even have classes at each of the six campuses in a single semester. “By virtualizing students based on their academic loads, we can bring that full experience together,” notes Alander. “Now they don’t have to travel from one campus to another just to run an application.”

Getting Away from “Old IT”
BYOD has generated some security concerns among educators, but Alander isn’t too worried. “Users are isolated to standard ports, and they’re not really ‘inside’ the network until they’re inside the virtual desktop,” he says. It’s not as if anyone can access every Lone Star folder from a mobile device; users with log-in credentials are confined to the specific files and apps provisioned to them via the desktop.

In the long run, it seems that BYOD and desktop virtualization are going to be must-haves for schools big and small. Just about every academic field is becoming more technical and software-centric, and students are demanding access to off-campus data, applications, and course content. “Anymore, we can’t just sit there and say, ‘we will support you if you do a, b, c, d, and e,” says Alander. “That’s old IT.”

—David LaMartina