New K12 Site license from Adobe!

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD K12 SCHOOL SITE LICENSE

Adobe is offering Creative Cloud for Education Device Licenses through a new licensing option, the Adobe K-12 School Site License. This offering is available for primary and secondary or K-12 schools only. The Adobe K-12 School Site License allows a school to install Creative Cloud for education device licenses on at least 100 school-owned or school-leased computers.

The Adobe Creative Cloud K-12 School Site License also comes with free access to the Adobe Education Exchange where teachers can download curriculum and share best practices with other teachers.

Adobe Creative Cloud K-12 Site Licenses Device Licenses are perfect for classrooms, labs, and environments where multiple users utilize the same application on a single computer without having to log-in or authenticate license ownership. Key features of Device Licenses include –

  • License for each institutional computer – rather than per user. Device licenses can only be installed on a single computer and do not allow for a second installation.
  • Online services are not included. Device licenses do not include cloud storage, Behance & Behance talent search, Adobe Typekit, PhoneGap Build, and Adobe Expert Services.

Adobe Creative Cloud for Education ushers in a new era of creativity and collaboration that gives your students and teachers everything they need to capture inspiration and work together to create amazing content across desktop and mobile. Give your students and teachers the world’s best tools and services to help them collaborate, create, and publish: Adobe Creative Cloud for Education.

Click here for more information on the Adobe Creative Cloud K12 School Site License

Click here for frequently asked questions about the Adobe Creative Cloud K12 School Site License

What’s Included in Adobe Creative Cloud for Education (Device Licenses)?

Desktop apps

  • Adobe Photoshop CC – Edit and composite images, use 3D tools, edit video and perform advanced image analysis.
  • Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC – Organize, edit and batch-process all your digital photos in one intuitive library.
  • Adobe Illustrator CC – Create vector-based graphics for print, web, video and mobile.
  • Adobe InDesign CC – Design professional layouts for print and digital publishing.
  • Adobe Muse CC – Create and publish dynamic websites without writing code.
  • Adobe Premiere Pro CC – Edit video with high-performance, industry-leading editing tools.
  • Adobe After Effects CC – Create industry-standard motion graphics and visual effects.
  • Adobe Dreamweaver CC – Design, develop and maintain standards-based websites and applications.
  • Adobe Flash Professional CC – Create rich interactive content across varied platforms and devices.
  • Adobe Acrobat Pro DC – Create, protect, sign, collaborate on and print PDF documents.
  • Adobe Audition CC – Create, edit and enhance audio for broadcast, video and film.
  • Adobe SpeedGrade CC – Manipulate light and color in video footage.
  • Adobe Prelude CC – Streamline the import and logging of video from any video format.
  • Adobe InCopy CC – Enable writers and designers to work simultaneously on the same document.
  • Adobe Bridge CC – Browse, organize and search your photos and design files in one central place.
  • Adobe Flash Builder Premium – Build exceptional applications for Android, BlackBerry and iOS using a single codebase.
  • Adobe Fireworks CS6 – Rapidly prototype websites and applications, and optimize web graphics.
  • Adobe Edge Tools & Services – Optimize the look and performance of websites.

Mobile apps

  • Capture apps: Adobe Brush, Shape, Color and Hue – Capture inspiration around you and then bring it into your creative process across desktop and mobile devices.
  • Design apps: Illustrator Draw, Illustrator Line, Photoshop Sketch, Comp and Preview – Create layouts and draw expressively on your mobile devices, and preview mobile designs on iOS devices.
  • Visual storytelling apps: Slate, Premiere Clip and Voice – Craft visual stories and animated videos and edit with the power of Premiere Pro CC on mobile.
  • Photography apps: Lightroom for mobile and Photoshop Mix – Bring the power of Adobe digital imaging to your mobile devices with full Photoshop and Lightroom compatibility.
  • Community apps: Behance and Creative Portfolio – Showcase and discover creative work, and connect with the creative community.

Exclusive Business Features for Creative Cloud for Education (Device License)

  • Centralized administration tools. Manage and track both Complete and Single-App seats from the handy Admin Console.
  • Creative Cloud Packager. Centrally deploy apps and updates across your organization.

RE-Blog: A case study on Virtual Desktops and BYOD at Lone Star College

Source: http://edcetera.rafter.com/virtual-desktops-and-byod-at-lone-star-college/

As the higher education environment becomes more digital – and more global – it’s growing increasingly difficult for schools to provide access to software and data. Most departments and programs require unique solutions, and contracting for individual licenses can become a mess. Quite a few schools have also merged into city- and state-wide consortia, and many students need to access programs on multiple campuses. Overall, the device-centric model of computing (and contracting) just doesn’t work anymore.

Fortunately, plenty of companies are now offering virtualization services that make the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) model feasible and affordable. Take the Lone Star College System, where Vice Chancellor Link Alander is implementing VMWare’s virtual desktop. Within the next year, Lone Star’s 90,000+ students and faculty will be able to use their own devices to access software and data from each of the system’s six campuses.

Focusing Wireless Density and Centralization
Lone Star began redesigning its IT infrastructure three years ago with a focus on wireless density and centralization. “Networking isn’t just about wireless anymore – it’s about wireless density,” says Alander. Because of its growing student body and the increasing tech demands of its academic programs, the system needed a way to centralize email, productivity apps, and critical data. “The virtual desktop was the only way to provide a rich, quality experience and still meet legal requirements around licensing,” Alander says.

For now, one Lone Star campus with roughly 7,000 students is taking advantage of the program. Students and teachers log in to a central hub for email and Office 365, as well as advanced editing tools like AutoCAD and Premier. Saving to the virtual desktop’s “My Documents” folder also routes their data to a private cloud.

The virtual environment works on a variety of devices and operating systems, as well. A Lone Star poll revealed a 2.6 to 1 IP address-to-student ratio, so the desktop’s interoperability is clearly needed. Some classes even feature device-centric content – especially for iPads – but the virtual environment allows Windows and Mac users to stay on the same page.

Finally, Lone Star’s new infrastructure has drastically streamlined workflows for students attending multiple campuses. Most LC students visit at least two campuses per week, and a few even have classes at each of the six campuses in a single semester. “By virtualizing students based on their academic loads, we can bring that full experience together,” notes Alander. “Now they don’t have to travel from one campus to another just to run an application.”

Getting Away from “Old IT”
BYOD has generated some security concerns among educators, but Alander isn’t too worried. “Users are isolated to standard ports, and they’re not really ‘inside’ the network until they’re inside the virtual desktop,” he says. It’s not as if anyone can access every Lone Star folder from a mobile device; users with log-in credentials are confined to the specific files and apps provisioned to them via the desktop.

In the long run, it seems that BYOD and desktop virtualization are going to be must-haves for schools big and small. Just about every academic field is becoming more technical and software-centric, and students are demanding access to off-campus data, applications, and course content. “Anymore, we can’t just sit there and say, ‘we will support you if you do a, b, c, d, and e,” says Alander. “That’s old IT.”

—David LaMartina